HTML map tips in QGIS


New fresh QGIS feature! So fresh in fact you can still smell the wet paint :)

QGIS (development build) can now display map tips using HTML (a subset anyway).

To enable the new map tips: Open the Layer Properties dialog for a layer and select the Display tab

Display tab to set HTML map tips

In action

Layer properties for HTML map tip

Notice how we can also use a QGIS expression. Anything inside [% %] will be evaluated and replaced with the value in real-time. We can even use a CASE statement. Pretty cool!

And the result when hovering over a feature

HTML in QGIS map tip? Yes! WOOT!

Hold on. Pause the track! We can even use some CSS to make it more fancy.


<style>
h1 {color:red;}
p.question {color:blue;}
</style>
<h1> [% "NAME" %] </h1>
<br>
<img src="[% "image" %]" />
<br>
<p class="question">Is this place a country?</p>
<br>
[% CASE WHEN "TYPE" = 'Country' THEN 'Yes' ELSE 'No. It is a ' || "TYPE" END %]
CSS in a html map tip

Happy Mapping :)

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Improvements to the QGIS rule based rendering


The rule based rendering in QGIS has just got a make over to improve in some of the old usability issues it used to have.  Most of the improvements are UI related. If you would like to try them out you will need to grab a copy of the latest dev build (qgis-dev in OSGeo4W)

Main improvements include:

  • Nested rules.  If the parent rule evaluates to false none of the child rules are applied. This replaces the priority system in the old dialog.
  • Disable symbol for rules. Rules with no symbol only act as a check for the child rules e.g nothing is rendered for the rule but child rules still are (unless also disabled).
  • Drag and Drop rules (multi-selection is supported).  Rules can be dragged onto other rules in order to nest them and set up a rendering hierarchy.
  • Inline editing of rule labels, expressions, scales
  • Overall tweaks to the dialog
The new rule dialog

As you can see in the screenshot, the rules are now organized in a tree which clearly expresses which rules should be applied and when.

In the example above, all the rules under the Sealed rule will only be applied if that rule is true. The old system would have you managing all rules in one big list and dealing with priorities in order to get the rules to apply right, the new dialog is a major improvement.

And the results! As you can see below, QGIS will only render the colored squares if the Sealed rule is true otherwise it just shows a green line.

The rules applied

The work was sponsored by Ville de Morges, Switzerland and developed by Martin Dobias.  Thanks to both of them for these improvements.

More info:

Note: As this is a brand new feature there might be some bugs, or things that don’t quite work as expected. If you do find something don’t hesitate to file a bug report at hub.qgis.org so it can be fixed, or at least known about.

New Tool: MapInfo to QGIS style converter


Hopefully this tool can be of some use to people, as I know it has been very helpful to me since I made it.

As I’m a pretty heavy QGIS user now, and my work place still stores most, if not all, of our data MapInfo TAB format, one  friction point for me using QGIS was having to restyle all the MapInfo layers.  If we only had a handful of layer this wouldn’t be such a pain but we have a lot of tables and it would take me months to go though each one manually and style them.

I thought “there has to be some way I can automate this…” and so the MapInfo To QGIS Style Generator (or mapinfoToQgis.py) was born. Knowing that QGIS uses QML (a XML file format) to store it style information, and that MapInfo was able to export a style string for each object, I compared what QGIS generated for its QML using the same symbol I picked in QGIS as I had in MapInfo.   Almost a 1 to 1 conversion! Once I worked out how to convert MapInfo point size  to QGIS symbol size, and MapInfo colour value to RGB it was just a matter of generating a QML with the correct values.

Long story short, after a bit of clean up and writing a user guide I would like release version 0.1 of the MapInfo To QGIS Style Generator for wider testing.

Here is a quick example of the output.

Step 1: Take One MapInfo table.

Step 2: Run it though mapinfoToQgis.py

python mapinfoToQgis.py WaterFittings.Tab WatterFittings.qml -c FittingType --UseMapInfo

Step 3: Load QML file in QGIS

Result from running mapinfoToQGIS.py

Step 4: Get a beer?

If you are using MapInfo Font symbols or normal MapInfo 3.0 everything should come across almost exactly. mapinfoToQgis.py will use the same fonts in QGIS as you did in MapInfo and select to the correct symbol size. Although if you are using custom MapInfo 3.0 symbols you will get the default QGIS black square symbol,you can just change it to something better after loading the QML.

Currently the program only support converting symbols but I plan on adding line and region support sometime in the future.

The program can be found at https://github.com/NathanW2/MapInfo-to-QGIS-style-generator and more detailed instructions and download link can be found at https://github.com/NathanW2/MapInfo-to-QGIS-style-generator/wiki/Using-MapInfo-to-QGIS-style-generator.

Like I said at the start, hopefully other people will find this tool handy as I know I have.  If you do find it handy let me know, I would love to hear peoples feedback.  Also if you find any bugs let me know in the comments or log a issue on https://github.com/NathanW2/MapInfo-to-QGIS-style-generator/issues

Enjoy :)

QGIS edit tools brainstorming or What edit tools should QGIS have?


One trend that come up a lot in the poll I recently ran (results will be out soon, just writing a summary blog post) is “Needs more powerful edit tools“.  And I agree.

Coming from a MapInfo background nothing much changes when you move to QGIS, MapInfo had the simple Add Point, Add Region, Add Line kind of tools and then you need to use plugins to do anything a bit more advanced (MapCAD).  QGIS has the start of a kind of MapCAD thing happening although not as complete.

Why not just let people write plugins?

However I think in order to make QGIS a more attractive package to a lot of people it needs to get some built in semi-advanced to advanced editing tools;  getting back to those poll results of “Needs more powerful edit tools”.

I thought to myself “What would I like QGIS to be able to do when it came to editing?” although I came up with a small set my editing needs are only relatively small.  I then thought the best way to find out what people need is to just create a blank canvas for people to throw their ideas around on and then go from there.

Why not just create a ticket?

My idea is to get a larger idea of what people need and want rather than just one-off tickets. Although the ideas will be at the edit tool idea level it will be easier to see how they should all fit together if they are all in one place and editable by other people.  You can then start asking questions like: Do we really need that UI there?  Can we merge these tools?  How should the output be handled?

The overall goal is to have a tight, thought out, group of edit tools rather then someone creating a plugin over here for one thing and some else creating something else over there.

So how do we get this going?

Well I have created a Google Document that anyone can edit and view in order to start brainstorming ideas. The link can be found here.

I have already created an example of two ideas that I would like to see.

So go ahead, throw some ideas up.  I’m interested to see where this can head.

Why use Google Docs and not the QGIS wiki?

Mainly because Google Docs makes it very easy to do frictionless editing of a document together.  No need for user names or passwords or overwriting someone else’s changes (Google Docs is all real time).

A QGIS user poll


I have just whipped up a small user poll for QGIS users. The poll is just to give me (and indirectly the team) some idea of people’s opinions about QGIS and what it could do better. The poll is only short (9 questions) and one of the main things is “What could QGIS do better?”.

The poll can be found here: https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDA5TW96Z19aNFU1OVpzSzFyRzFybmc6MQ

All the answers are anonymous so feel free to say what you like about anything. In the end if something isn’t working the way you think it should, write it down. It’s not going to hurt anyone’s feelings :)

If you are a partial QGIS users who mostly uses MapInfo or ESRI stuff I would also like to get your opinion.

Another cool open source project – OSGeo-Live


Another cool open source project that I have become a part of (as a QGIS packager and tester) is the OSGeo-Live project.  The OSGeo-Live project is a live DVD/USB/Virtual Machine built on xUbuntu(striped down Ubuntu linux) that has a lot of cool open source geo spatial programs all set up and ready to use.

The OSGeo-Live project contains:

  • Browser clients
  • A small sample of crisis management software
  • All the popular database engines (PostGIS, SpaitalLite etc)
  • Pretty much all the open source desktop GIS apps (QGIS, uDig etc)
  • Open Source GPS navigation apps and globes.
  • A collection of handy spatial tools
  • A ready to go web services ready to try in your browser or desktop GIS.
  • Some sample data to get started with for each project
  • And quick starts for each program.

The full list of software contained on the OSGeo-Live project can be found at http://live.osgeo.org/en/overview/overview.html

This is a good project if you want to get into the OSGeo tools and experiment but don’t want to install them on main machine until you know what you need.

As it is a live DVD/USB/Virtual Machine some apps will run slower than what they do on a native install but overall the speed is usable and good enough for testing.

Even better is that it was born in Australia :)

The project is also commercial supported by a Australian company http://lisasoft.com

So give it a try if you are interested in the OSGeo movement, which you should be if you are reading my blog :)

Fresh off the press – QGIS 1.7 is released!


Tonight Tim Sutton officially made the release announcement for QGIS 1.7, so I’m guess I’m free to blog about the newest version now and its cool features.

 

 

 

 

What are you still doing here? Go and get it! http://www.qgis.org/wiki/Download

I am, as a heavy QGIS user and a guy-who-tries-to-write-features-and-patches-for-the-code, very happy with this release. I know a lot of people have put a lot of hard work and free time into working on features and bug fixes that keep making this free GIS system even better.

Some of the more notable new features in this release are…well there are just way to many for me to list here so go and check out the official list at http://qgis.org/component/content/article/127-qgis-1-7-release.html

The QGIS team has shifted their source control system to using GIT, which I am very happy about as a lot of the guys on the #qgis IRC channel will know :). The bug tracer has also been moved tohttp://hub.qgis.org/projects/quantum-gis.

Since the release of QGIS 1.6 there have been 1199 commits (using git to count: git log –pretty=oneline upstream/release-1_6_0..upstream/release-1_7_0 | wc -l). Not a bad effort if I may so myself.

 

If you are still reading this, I really hope it’s because you are waiting for QGIS 1.7 to install.